Wednesday, June 27, 2012
The Wedding Day
The dawning wedding day heralds the happiest and holiest day of one’s life. This day is considered a personal Yom Kippur for the chatan (Hebrew for groom) and kallah (bride), for on this day all their past mistakes are forgiven as they merge into a new, complete soul.
As on Yom Kippur, both the chatan and kallah fast (in this case, from dawn until after the completion of the marriage ceremony). And at the ceremony, the chatan wears a kittel, the traditional white robe worn on Yom Kippur.

The Wedding Day

The dawning wedding day heralds the happiest and holiest day of one’s life. This day is considered a personal Yom Kippur for the chatan (Hebrew for groom) and kallah (bride), for on this day all their past mistakes are forgiven as they merge into a new, complete soul.

As on Yom Kippur, both the chatan and kallah fast (in this case, from dawn until after the completion of the marriage ceremony). And at the ceremony, the chatan wears a kittel, the traditional white robe worn on Yom Kippur.

Tuesday, June 26, 2012
Bridal canopy
A traditional Jewish wedding ceremony takes place under a Chuppah or wedding canopy, symbolizing the new home being built by the couple when they become husband and wife.

Bridal canopy

A traditional Jewish wedding ceremony takes place under a Chuppah or wedding canopy, symbolizing the new home being built by the couple when they become husband and wife.

Presentation of the ring (Betrothal)
In traditional weddings, two blessings are recited before the betrothal; a blessing over wine, and the betrothal blessing, which is specified in the Talmud.The wine is then tasted by the couple.
The groom gives the bride a ring, traditionally a plain wedding band, and recites the declaration: Behold, you are consecrated to me with this ring according to the law of Moses and Israel. The groom places the ring on the bride’s right index finger. According to traditional Jewish law, two valid witnesses must see him place the ring.
During some egalitarian weddings, the bride will also present a ring to the groom, often with a quote from the Song of Songs: “Ani l’dodi, ve dodi li” (I am my beloved’s and my beloved is mine), which may also be inscribed on the ring itself.This ring is sometimes presented outside the chuppa to avoid conflicts with Jewish law.

Presentation of the ring (Betrothal)

In traditional weddings, two blessings are recited before the betrothal; a blessing over wine, and the betrothal blessing, which is specified in the Talmud.The wine is then tasted by the couple.

The groom gives the bride a ring, traditionally a plain wedding band, and recites the declaration: Behold, you are consecrated to me with this ring according to the law of Moses and Israel. The groom places the ring on the bride’s right index finger. According to traditional Jewish law, two valid witnesses must see him place the ring.

During some egalitarian weddings, the bride will also present a ring to the groom, often with a quote from the Song of Songs: “Ani l’dodi, ve dodi li” (I am my beloved’s and my beloved is mine), which may also be inscribed on the ring itself.This ring is sometimes presented outside the chuppa to avoid conflicts with Jewish law.

Encircling the groom
The bride traditionally walks around the groom three or seven times when she arrives at the Chuppah. This may derive from Jeremiah 31:22, “A woman shall surround a man”. The three circuits may represent the three virtues of marriage: righteousness, justice and loving kindness (see Hosea 2:21). Seven circuits derives from the Biblical concept that seven denotes perfection or completeness.Sephardic Jews do not perform this wedding ceremony.

Encircling the groom

The bride traditionally walks around the groom three or seven times when she arrives at the Chuppah. This may derive from Jeremiah 31:22, “A woman shall surround a man”. The three circuits may represent the three virtues of marriage: righteousness, justice and loving kindness (see Hosea 2:21). Seven circuits derives from the Biblical concept that seven denotes perfection or completeness.Sephardic Jews do not perform this wedding ceremony.

Unterfirers
In many communities, the groom is led under the chuppah by the two fathers and the bride by the two mothers, known as unterfirers (lit. ones who lead under).

Unterfirers

In many communities, the groom is led under the chuppah by the two fathers and the bride by the two mothers, known as unterfirers (lit. ones who lead under).

Covering of the bride
Prior to the ceremony, Ashkenazi Jews have a custom to cover the face of the bride (usually with a veil), and a prayer is often said for her based on the words spoken to Rebecca in Genesis 24:60.The veiling ritual is known in Yiddish as badeken. Various reasons are given for the veil and the ceremony.Sephardic Jews do not perform this ceremony.

Covering of the bride

Prior to the ceremony, Ashkenazi Jews have a custom to cover the face of the bride (usually with a veil), and a prayer is often said for her based on the words spoken to Rebecca in Genesis 24:60.The veiling ritual is known in Yiddish as badeken. Various reasons are given for the veil and the ceremony.Sephardic Jews do not perform this ceremony.

Signing of the Jewish marriage contract
Before the wedding ceremony, the ketubah, or marriage contract, is signed in the presence of two witnesses.The ketubah details the husband’s obligations to his wife, among which are food, clothing, and marital relations. This document has the standing of a legally binding agreement. It is often written as an illuminated manuscript that is framed and displayed in their home. Under the chuppa, it is traditional to read the signed ketubah aloud, usually in the Aramaic original, but sometimes in translation. Traditionally, this is done to separate the two basic parts of the wedding.Secular couples may opt for a shortened version to be read out.

Signing of the Jewish marriage contract

Before the wedding ceremony, the ketubah, or marriage contract, is signed in the presence of two witnesses.The ketubah details the husband’s obligations to his wife, among which are food, clothing, and marital relations. This document has the standing of a legally binding agreement. It is often written as an illuminated manuscript that is framed and displayed in their home. Under the chuppa, it is traditional to read the signed ketubah aloud, usually in the Aramaic original, but sometimes in translation. Traditionally, this is done to separate the two basic parts of the wedding.Secular couples may opt for a shortened version to be read out.

Today, erusin/kiddushin occurs when the groom gives the bride a ring or other object of value with the intent of creating a Jewish marriage. There are differing opinions as to which part of the ceremony constitutes nissuin/chuppah; they include standing under the canopy - itself called a chuppah - and being alone together in a room (yichud). While historically these two events could take place as much as a year apart, they are now commonly combined into one ceremony.

Today, erusin/kiddushin occurs when the groom gives the bride a ring or other object of value with the intent of creating a Jewish marriage. There are differing opinions as to which part of the ceremony constitutes nissuin/chuppah; they include standing under the canopy - itself called a chuppah - and being alone together in a room (yichud). While historically these two events could take place as much as a year apart, they are now commonly combined into one ceremony.

Monday, June 25, 2012
Jewish wedding rings, a beautiful symbol of attachment, play a key role in the Jewish wedding ceremony. In the time of the Talmud, a man would give a woman a coin worth a small amount of money. Although we use a Jewish wedding ring nowadays, the deep messages behind the circularity of the coin have been translated into the giving of a perfectly circular ring with no added diamonds or gems.
A circle, in Jewish thought, represents the idea of encountering the same experience over and over but with a deeper insight. As we come around the circle, each time completing another ‘lap,’ we hope to be able to learn from our previous experiences and show our personal growth when encountering a familiar situation.

Jewish wedding rings, a beautiful symbol of attachment, play a key role in the Jewish wedding ceremony. In the time of the Talmud, a man would give a woman a coin worth a small amount of money. Although we use a Jewish wedding ring nowadays, the deep messages behind the circularity of the coin have been translated into the giving of a perfectly circular ring with no added diamonds or gems.

A circle, in Jewish thought, represents the idea of encountering the same experience over and over but with a deeper insight. As we come around the circle, each time completing another ‘lap,’ we hope to be able to learn from our previous experiences and show our personal growth when encountering a familiar situation.

A Jewish wedding is a wedding ceremony that follows Jewish law and traditions.
While wedding ceremonies vary, common features of a Jewish wedding include a ketubah (marriage contract) which is signed by two witnesses, a wedding canopy (chuppah or huppah), a ring owned by the groom that is given to the bride under the canopy, and the breaking of a glass.
For more information visit: Jewish marriage customs

A Jewish wedding is a wedding ceremony that follows Jewish law and traditions.

While wedding ceremonies vary, common features of a Jewish wedding include a ketubah (marriage contract) which is signed by two witnesses, a wedding canopy (chuppah or huppah), a ring owned by the groom that is given to the bride under the canopy, and the breaking of a glass.

For more information visit: Jewish marriage customs